Two Post Lift

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This article is on the installation of a Greg Smith Pro 9F 9000lb two post hoist.

So, some various parts lying around my shop:

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Here I am starting to drill the anchor bolts (no I am not hiding but trying to be on top of the drill....) ;-)

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Click on the picture for high rez image

using a 3/4" Hilti bit and my trusty concrete drill....cuts through 30 year old concrete like butter...

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The anchors are driven in and torqued to 85 ft-lbs. All 12 anchors (six to a side) gripped well with very little pullout...and all torqued to spec.

Here is the base of the lift all bolted down...the plate is 7/8" plate. I had to shim under the base to allow for both the floor slope (natural in a garage) and the irregularities of the concrete. No problem, I just used 1" washers and metal shims to make sure there is lots of surface contact between the lift and the slab...

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Putting the top plates on the posts. There is a cable system that runs from the each side, along the floor, up the post and through a pulley on the top plate down to the carriage. These cables equalize each carriage so if a cylinder gets ahead the other the two carriages stay level.

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There is one cylinder for each carriage...you can see the chain that is used for the lifting as well as the cables for the equalization...

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Here is a shot of the carriage...

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OK we are ready to test (after wiring, testing, hydralics, etc.). First of all a small lift...nice and stable..

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And higher...

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And pretty well to the top for now (until I put in a mechanical stop so the car does not hit the ceiling...next list of stuff).

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So, what are my impressions?

- this lift is stable. I pulled down the end of the car with little movement. You can get the car to rock a little bit if you push pull but not by much...the columns do not move at all but its flex between the arm pivots and the slack in the carriages

- Even with 10'4" ceilings there is plenty of room underneath the lift to almost stand (I am 6")

- the wheelbase on the car is quite small so the arms on the lift are too long. The jackpoints on the 911 actually fit on top of the arms so I need to get adaptors to make sure the 911 is really anchored to the lift. You also need to roll the car back and forth in order to have the arms of the lift fit between the wheels (its hard to explain).

- the arms on the lift cross over the oil tank drain so I am not sure how well oil changes go (yet). I am sure there are ways around this.

- This lift is rated for 9000lbs so lifting the 993 is easy...it pump does not even sound loaded..

- there is no stop built in except for a the limit of the raise. This means there is a danger of lifting the car too much. I will setup some stop system which will prevent the lift from getting "out of control"

This particlular lift is built like a tank and I would not hesitate to recommend it!!

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